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Weather Data Shouldn’t Alter Planting Season Plans

Seed Consultants at NFMS

 

photoForecast anxiety can cause a world of pain for growers as they wait to experience conditions for spring planting and the coming crop season. Yesterday, HAT reported expectations for a cool, wet spring across Indiana according to DTN Ag Meteorologist, Bryce Anderson. Before you hit the panic button and readjust your plans for 2014, Todd Jeffries of Seed Consultants urges farmers to carry out business as usual.

“I start getting calls pretty early when people start reading articles. Harvest might not even be done yet and they already want to switch their order because they heard we’re going to have a dry year and want to plan 100-day corn. Down in southeast Indiana, we don’t need to do that. You know you want to plant as full of a season as possible and give yourself the best chance for the best yield.”

Jeffries says patience is key for weather-frustrated growers who want to get in the field too early.

“You don’t want to get out on the ground when it’s too wet. You don’t want to bud in the corn or the beans because you’re going to hurt the chances for the seed and you’re going to compact the soil, causing problems in the long run. So don’t jump the gun too much. Wait for it to dry out even though it’s going to drive you crazy from time to time.”

Covering southeast Indiana, Jeffries gives an example of an area that practices patience each growing season; this one will be no exception.

“They can’t get into the fields until Memorial Day weekend and they typically have some pretty good yields. The whole rest of my territory might be completely done planting and those guys are just still sitting around talking to each other. Then when it’s finally fit to plant they get in there and get pretty good yield.”c

Forecast anxiety can cause a world of pain for growers as they wait to experience conditions for spring planting and the coming crop season. Yesterday, HAT reported expectations for a cool, wet spring across Indiana according to DTN Ag Meteorologist, Bryce Anderson. Before you hit the panic button and readjust your plans for 2014, Todd Jeffries of Seed Consultants urges farmers to carry out business as usual.

“I start getting calls pretty early when people start reading articles. Harvest might not even be done yet and they already want to switch their order because they heard we’re going to have a dry year and want to plan 100-day corn. Down in southeast Indiana, we don’t need to do that. You know you want to plant as full of a season as possible and give yourself the best chance for the best yield.”

Jeffries says patience is key for weather-frustrated growers who want to get in the field too early.

“You don’t want to get out on the ground when it’s too wet. You don’t want to bud in the corn or the beans because you’re going to hurt the chances for the seed and you’re going to compact the soil, causing problems in the long run. So don’t jump the gun too much. Wait for it to dry out even though it’s going to drive you crazy from time to time.”

Covering southeast Indiana, Jeffries gives an example of an area that practices patience each growing season; this one will be no exception.

“They can’t get into the fields until Memorial Day weekend and they typically have some pretty good yields. The whole rest of my territory might be completely done planting and those guys are just still sitting around talking to each other. Then when it’s finally fit to plant they get in there and get pretty good yield.”

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