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Too Cool, Too Wet for Fieldwork

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Brian Bush
Brian Bush

Too Cool, Too Wet for Fieldwork

The DuPont Pioneer agronomy update is back again this year on Hoosier Ag Today. This is a weekly update from agronomists around the state on local field and crop conditions.  Our first report focuses on East Central Indiana. Brian Bush says fields in the East Central part of the state are still too wet and cold for any planting activity.  His advice is to watch the forecast for a window of dry and warm conditions, “It is one thing to plant when the soil temp is 55 degrees and warming, but quite another to plant when a cold front is coming with cold wet rain. I have seen too many times when we get uneven emergence and just don’t get the crop off to a good start.”

 

The April forecast does not seem to have any long stretches of dry and warm weather. Bush urges growers to have a plan as to what fields will get worked first when we do get a few dry days, “With a plan that takes into account which fields warm up first and dry out fast. This will help when you have only a few days to get a crop in the ground.” He added that setting priorities now will help give you guidance when things get crazy at planting.

 

While some fieldwork did get accomplished in March, soils are still too wet to consider putting equipment on them. Even if you are looking to do a burndown treatment, Bush says it still may be too cold, “You want to have several days above 50 degrees or the plants will not take up the herbicide properly.” He said the last thing you want to do is go out and spray and then have to do it over again later. Bush noted that many growers are wanting to burndown cover crops or get a start on controlling winter annuals, but the weather and field conditions have not been stable yet.

 

 

Get the complete DuPont Pioneer agronomy report on our web site and on the agronomy page on the Hoosier Ag Today Mobile app.